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Prescription drug crimes could get you in trouble with the law

On Behalf of | Mar 2, 2022 | Drug Crimes

When you think about drug charges, you probably imagine someone being charged for possessing an illegal substance. What you may not imagine is someone being charged for possessing prescription medications.

If you have prescription medications that don’t belong to you in your possession or are selling your own prescription medications to someone else, then there is a possibility that you could be charged with a crime.

The law views prescription sales just as seriously as illicit drug sales, because technically those drugs are only for you. Even if they aren’t as addictive or dangerous to others, you will have violated the law if you sold your own prescription medications.

Prescription drugs are only for the person who was prescribed them

It’s vital to remember that any prescription medication is only legal when it’s being used by the person to whom it was prescribed. It is against the law to knowingly or intentionally obtain or possess that substance unless you have a prescription for it.

It is illegal to use or take prescription medications that belong to a friend or relative no matter why you do it. Unfortunately, this is where many people end up getting in trouble.

I have the same prescription as my friend, so can we borrow each other’s medications?

No. Even if you have the same prescription, there is a limited quantity on the prescription packaging. Your medical provider may have stated that you could have 30 pills only within a three-month period, for example, so taking additional from a friend or relative would be against the law. If you run short on a medication that you need, it’s a better idea to talk to your medical provider. They may realize that the drug isn’t working as intended or that you need to be switched to another medication to better address your health issues.

If you aren’t sure if a drug is legal to possess, it’s better not to possess it until you can be sure. If you’re stopped by an officer and accused of drug crimes, then remember that you should put together a strong defense to help protect yourself.

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